Suburban Assault

Hump Day Pics Of The Week – 254

with one comment

It’s time to pick the Hump Day Pics Of The Week. Again, thanks goes out to the contributors to the Suburban Assault Flickr Pool.

No theme this week, just great photography.

I hope you enjoy this set and check back each week to see what shots get picked. Be sure to check out the Flickr page to see all the awesome bike shots shared by our extremely talented contributors.

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© photom!

photom!

Country Roads

“Country Roads” © SaddleUpBike

SaddleUpBike - Website: Saddle Up Bike

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© All images are subject to Flickr Copyright Rules.

By submitting images to the Suburban Assault Flickr group, you are allowing the limited, non-profit, non-commercial usage of your images, as described by the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, for non-commercial use on this non-commercial blog. In return you will receive FULL photo credit and links to your Flickr Photostream.

Written by dickdavid

July 16, 2014 at 12:24 pm

Found In An Old Shed – Columbia 500

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Cheap 60's Steel

We started clearing out an old shed in my mother-in-law’s yard, so that it can be demolished in a few weeks. The shed had been unused, probably, for decades – so who knows what was living in there. All I know is that, with my fear of wasps and spiders – and not to mention small critters that bite – I wasn’t going near it. Fortunately, my wife is a badass and those things don’t seem to bother her. Once I got the overgrown shrub chopped down from in front of the door, it was easier for her to gain access and drag out this beauty for me.

Reading on, you’ll see that I use the term ‘beauty’ quite loosely and probably with a bit of sarcasm.

I’d spotted this ‘beauty’ a few months back, when we had originally thought about clearing out the shed. Through the shrub and slightly opened door, I could see the dark silhouette of an old bike, left to rust at the back of this dark shed. I kept wondering if this was some sort of forgotten treasure of vintage steal, that was only waiting to be salvaged and restored to it’s former glory. Even when my wife, bravely, rolled it out over the busted bags of fertilizer and potting soil, I had high hopes that it was going to be a ‘beauty.’

Not this time. Upon closer inspection, I realized that this bike had seen much better days. The rust, corrosion and the decades of Texas summers had taken it’s toll on this guy. Even so, my mind started wandering into a world of sand paper, chrome polish and elbow grease, to see this ‘beauty’ restored to a showroom finish. Perhaps I had seen too many episodes of American Restorations on the History channel. Unfortunately, I had been down the road of restoration, and the result – if ever finished – is never worth the amount of work I would put into it.

I wondered if it would be worth it to pay somebody to restore it. But then I started to look into the brand and model of the bike. It’s an old (I’m assuming late 60′s early 70′s) Columbia 500. After doing some digging on-the-line, I discovered that the Columbia brand, although it has a rich heritage of building bikes since 1877, is known for manufacturing “…quality bikes at affordable prices. Developed to satisfy the demands of the casual rider, who expects the feature, quality and confidence in a brand of bikes found in specialty bike shops. Columbia bikes offer a brand that is well recognized by consumers and at the same time offers a different product at a great value!” I read this as cheap department store quality bike.

After doing a bit more, light digging, I came to realize that it wouldn’t be worth the effort or expense to restore this ‘beauty.’ It’s too bad I don’t own a small bike shop or café, because this would make the perfect decoration to hang over the awning.

Columbia 500

Written by dickdavid

July 15, 2014 at 10:22 pm

Hump Day Pics Of The Week – 253

leave a comment »

It’s time to pick the Hump Day Pics Of The Week. Again, thanks goes out to the contributors to the Suburban Assault Flickr Pool.

No theme this week, just great photography.

I hope you enjoy this set and check back each week to see what shots get picked. Be sure to check out the Flickr page to see all the awesome bike shots shared by our extremely talented contributors.

After The Storm

“After The Storm” © james jay

james jay - Website: http://jamesjay.wordpress.com

Bleriot on the Ship Canal

“Bleriot on the Ship Canal” © Papahazama

Papahazama

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© All images are subject to Flickr Copyright Rules.

By submitting images to the Suburban Assault Flickr group, you are allowing the limited, non-profit, non-commercial usage of your images, as described by the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, for non-commercial use on this non-commercial blog. In return you will receive FULL photo credit and links to your Flickr Photostream.

Written by dickdavid

July 9, 2014 at 4:31 pm

Watch Out For Road Hazards

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Watch Out

 

I saw this on Alma Road in Plano, Texas, the city that neighbors mine. I’m not sure if this was painted by the city or by a concerned citizen, but it definitely caught my eye. Unfortunately, with it’s placement right next to the actual hazard, so it’s too late to do anything to avoid it.

Perhaps the city of Plano will fix this road soon, because it’s one of the best routes for cyclists into town.

Written by dickdavid

July 9, 2014 at 5:49 am

Hump Day Pics Of The Week – 252

leave a comment »

It’s time to pick the Hump Day Pics Of The Week. Again, thanks goes out to the contributors to the Suburban Assault Flickr Pool.

No theme this week, just great photography.

I hope you enjoy this set and check back each week to see what shots get picked. Be sure to check out the Flickr page to see all the awesome bike shots shared by our extremely talented contributors.

Ming Bike

“Ming Bike” © Georgette

Georgette

Coffee Outside

“Coffee Outside” © rperks1

rperks1 - Website: Ocean Air Cycles

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© All images are subject to Flickr Copyright Rules.

By submitting images to the Suburban Assault Flickr group, you are allowing the limited, non-profit, non-commercial usage of your images, as described by the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, for non-commercial use on this non-commercial blog. In return you will receive FULL photo credit and links to your Flickr Photostream.

Written by dickdavid

July 2, 2014 at 7:05 am

Orp Horn – A Bike Accessory I Hope To Never Use

with 2 comments

ORP Horn

I have a bell on my bike. It’s nice to have when you want to let the folks, especially pedestrians on my local multipurpose trails, know that you want to pass them. Because many are wearing earbuds, just saying “passing on your left,” isn’t enough.

But what about on the road? What happens if some idiot in a car doesn’t look and cuts me off? I don’t think the bell will do the trick at announcing my presence. Sure, I can yell at the top of my lungs, but I hope their stereo isn’t turned up too loud. Although I’ve never had the need, I was okay with having to do that if needed.

Over a year ago, I stumbled across the Orp Horn on Kickstarter. It’s cool little bike accessory that would reduce my need to yell in an emergency situation. Their idea was to make cyclists more visible and “hearable” with a combination dual tone, high decibel bike horn and front beacon light. The result is a really loud horn that fits into a small package.

What really appealed to me was it’s slick design. The horn has unibody construction that is formed to look good and function well. It comes in several different color options, and I decided to go with orange.

ORP Bike Horn

Well, after several long months after it funded, I finally got mine. It came in a really cool package that, once unfolded, doubles as the instruction sheet. I was pleased to see efforts put into the design – even in the packaging – to reduce waste. The Orp Horn came, not damaged, but it came slightly unfinished. There was a little bit of the cover that wasn’t locked into place. A quick snap and it was fine.

ORP Horn - Slight Shipping Defect

The Orp Horn is cleverly designed with a one-size, built-on strap. This fits perfectly on wider diameter handlebars. If you have a smaller diameter bar, you’ll need to use the included rubber strip to keep the horn from slipping.

Time to test it out. The first thing you need to do, after you mount it, is turn it on. This is done by pressing and holding the button on the top for 3 seconds. It makes a cheerful chirp to let you know that it’s activated. Tapping the button again turns on the flashing light feature. Tapping it again, gives you a solid light. To turn it off, you need to press and hold the button for another 3 seconds.

The Orp Horn comes  with two sounds. When you push up on the lever, it gives you a friendly chirp. When you pull down on the lever, you get the super loud chirp. It’s not like an air horn that you hear coming from most cars, but it’s loud enough to make a statement. Given it’s compact size, the sound is quite remarkable.

This is a great accessory to add to my rides. My hope is that I will never need to use the Orp Horn, but if I do, it’s comforting to know that I can let car drivers hear that I’m there.

 UPDATE:

Where To Buy:  I got mine for a deal on Kickstarter, which funded last year. You can still buy them on their site for a bit more: click here.

Written by dickdavid

July 1, 2014 at 6:00 pm

Hump Day Pics Of The Week – 251

with one comment

It’s time to pick the Hump Day Pics Of The Week. Again, thanks goes out to the contributors to the Suburban Assault Flickr Pool.

No theme this week, just great photography.

I hope you enjoy this set and check back each week to see what shots get picked. Be sure to check out the Flickr page to see all the awesome bike shots shared by our extremely talented contributors.

Bowie Invades Prince

“Bowie Invades Prince” © Greg Raisman

Greg Raisman - Website: Getting Around Portland

Into The Light

“Into The Light” © Mark

Mark

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© All images are subject to Flickr Copyright Rules.

By submitting images to the Suburban Assault Flickr group, you are allowing the limited, non-profit, non-commercial usage of your images, as described by the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, for non-commercial use on this non-commercial blog. In return you will receive FULL photo credit and links to your Flickr Photostream.

Written by dickdavid

June 25, 2014 at 5:52 am

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